As you might recall from the prior blog entry, we have been in an anxious waiting period to see if the National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) would even agree to see me for their Adoptive Cell Transfer (ACT) research program for metastatic melanoma.

I am pleased to report that NCI contacted me last night and today confirmed that I have an appointment to come in for a full battery of testing and screening in about 10 days. We’ll be in the Bethesda, Maryland area (just outside of Washington, D.C.) for several days, working in a bit of rest and relaxation before and after the testing, which I have been told is quite intense.

The testing will determine whether I am a good subject (biologically speaking) for their research protocol. I have been told by the staff at Mass General that I should hear back about my acceptance (or not) a week or so after the testing has been completed, so by the end of August or beginning of September.

If NCI were to go ahead with me as a subject, the soonest I could be scheduled for any invasive procedure (e.g. surgery or biopsy) would be four weeks after my last dose of Sylatron, because that’s how long they have determined it takes to completely leave my system. With that in mind, I did not take my final (eighth) induction-level Sylatron dose last night, meaning that I will be “clean”  on September 1st.

I don’t know that I will have anything more to report until after my screening, but I am relieved to at least have gotten my foot in the door at NCI for now, and will hope the screening shows I am ideal for their program.

In the meantime, I expect my energy levels to slowly start coming back, along with my appetite, as the Sylatron works its way out of my system. That should mean I can enjoy some nice meals with friends in the DC area when I am there. Woo hoo!

By the way, by odd coincidence, shortly after I finished my blog entry on Wednesday discussing ACT, I came across news that the same sort of process had been using to successfully tackle incurable leukemia, which is an indication of how powerful this process can be when it works. Details are here from CBS News.