I find I have been remiss in promptly relating the latest news in my on-going challenge in dealing with my cancer diagnosis, and for that I apologize, as I have received a number of anxious messages from friends.

Let me start this entry by saying that the scans I had last week came back as “not too bad”. One might normally see “not too bad” as being “not so good”, but in this case, it was a major relief.

The brain MRI I had “came back clean”, which, far from suggesting I am empty-headed, confirms the radiologists found nothing suggesting the cancer had entered my brain. This is a truly good thing.

With respect to my chest and pelvic CT scan, let me first say that after dealing with two huge bottles of barium sulfate (flavored but chalky – I recommend the berry over the banana) over an hour to help provide better details of my innards, I was then also injected via an IV with an iodine contrast solution to help show my vascular system in the scan.

The injection of the contrast is best described as a surreal and totally uncomfortable process, as it causes a hot flash to rush through your system, causes mild dizziness, a weird flavor in your mouth, and – the most disconcerting thing – a flash of heat to one’s sphincter and urinary system making one wonder if there will be some sort of unintentional release of unwanted substances (fortunately, that did not happen).

The whole hot flash, from start to finish lasts less than a minute, but it’s really not fun at all. I’m curious if there’s any similarity to a menopausal hot flash – comments from folks who have experienced both are welcome.

Unfortunately, I will have to repeat the CT scan and iodine contrast and barium sulfate ingestion again in three months. That’s because the CT scan found that I had mildly enlarged bilateral axillary (in both armpits) lymph nodes – 1 cm in my left armpit, and 0.9 cm in my right armpit. Not enough of a concern to deal with now, especially as my lymphatic system is a bit upset after the removal of a lymph node, but that will need monitoring down the road, with the aforementioned repeat CT scan three months from now.

On a similar note, the CT scan also found that the lymph nodes in my right groin were enlarged. Again, not surprising, but these will be taken care of by my May 9th lymphadenectomy, which will remove all the lymph nodes in my right groin (and thus the reported enlarged lymph nodes there as well).

So, that was the “not too bad” part of my scan results. The good part of the CT scan was that no other signs were found that the cancer had entered my organs. In other words, no metastasis (pronounced “metahss-tah-sis”, by the way). It should be noted that the CT scan can only show if things are enlarged or somehow misshaped or of the wrong size – it cannot detect cancer, so my scan showed all my organs were normal in size and shape. I will take that as most excellent news, and cause for mild celebration (which I will defer until I am reunited with my wife and kids in less than a week).

The other thing that happened to buoy my spirits was word that we had been approved for the apartment in Boston we wanted to rent, located in the West End of Boston on the 37th floor of a 38 floor building and great views. Better yet, the apartment is a mere 7-10 minute walk from Massachusetts General Hospital. The apartment provides me with a comfortable and convenient “nest”, and should be a rather grounding and stabilizing support during my upcoming cancer treatments.

On top of that, today I managed to get approved for a Zipcar account, even with my Bonaire driver’s license, with Zipcar cars being available in the garage in our apartment building. For those of you not familiar with Zipcar, it’s a highly automated car rental service which allows you to rent a vehicle for as little as an hour, and has dozens of pick-up and drop-off locations in major metropolitan areas.

After a lot of phone calls and e-mails, I managed to get our rental furniture scheduled for delivery to the apartment this Wednesday, and with the help of a dear friend (thank you LaDonna!) and a couple of hired strong men, I will be moving into the apartment in Boston on Thursday, with my wife and kids and cat arriving from Bonaire on Sunday afternoon.

It’s nice to have all these pieces come together so well (although not easily) after all the stress and anxiety I went through last week.

At this point, other than weekly appointments to check on my skin graft (which is healing, but slower than I would like), I don’t have any serious medical issues to deal with until my surgery on May 9th.

However, it doesn’t mean I will be silent here on my blog until then – I have a number of issues I want to raise with respect to dealing with cancer, including perceptions, labels, books, cellular biology, adjusting to unusual environs, and alternative treatments, among other topics.

So stay tuned…